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to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy. so much of what they sell and they produce is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as
new york city. caller: obama was quite intelligent on that first debate because he let romney state his entire case. most people cannot remember that many facts and it must have given obama a chance to check off the facts. he josh credibility just by appearing on the stage, so for going word for word it just up to the answer -- upped the ante. he let the press do his talking about a 47% for the rest of the week. he let the press carry aloft for him. host: glenn thrush. guest: they should have hired you to do these been. i'm from new york and i used to play in the schoolyard. there was no intention for it to go down that way. the stock out the words was just -- the staff was ashen faced. they did not know it at the time. host: stuart stevens loved the idea of having an american icon as a warm-up act. they had been assured that clint eastwood would more or less played by their rules but they had not enforced any discipline. he delivered a bizarre rambling lecture to an empty chair that became an instant you to classic and not in a good way. guest: he and the campaign manager for ronny
visited rod page, a young woman's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city, one of the first and most successful pilot projects for girls public schools. i remember the time i invited senator barbara to texas. we have worked together for so many years. we worked together on the appropriations committee for nasa. i wanted her to see the great work that they are doing their. -- there. then i took her to the houston rodeo. i want her to see the texas altculture. i'm not sure if she knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo. suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and day care and big cath. -- big hair and big hats. she said to me, if we were here on monday and went to the chamber of commerce --these people look like -- uch.i said, yeah, pretty m we want to make sure that our stay at home moms and dads and the same opportunity for security savings as those who work outside of the home have. it has been a huge success. we also cosponsored the national breast and cervical cancer early protection program. she is a skilled legislator and a dear frie
in over the long term. host: there is a piece this morning in "the new york times" -- the essence of this is something that you probably remember well. the agreement between the george herbert walker bush and democrats. the president lost reelection because he promised no new taxes in 1998, he lost in 1992. are their roots of what we're dealing with today going back to 1990? guest: there are several names that are not spoken of in black republican circles. one of them is george bush 41. if you remember, president bush doing the no new taxes. also remember, ron redmond agreed to tax increases five times. this is a relatively recent occurs within the republican party. it was less economically oriented than it was in a temper political gain. they thought it was a way to gain political power rather than a reason to be economically. on this issue. you said he was a prominent republican. bruce today no longer considers himself to be a republican. he is outspoken about some of the economic craziness that has come from the party. he is what i would call an economic rationalist. host: stat
, there was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. an immigrant bought it. he said i will figure out some way to use it. seven years later, he created a company that has hired 1500 employees and will do $1 billion of sales. it is the number one yogurt brand. seven years ago, it was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. the impact more broadly is pretty significant. >> you talk about how countries around the world are trying to copy that secret sauce of america's innovative society. do any of you see any indication that the united states' appeal, from its great research universities or to people who want to start companies, that the united states has lost any of this appeal? >> absolutely. the university may be different, but as it relates to the entrepreneur ship and creating companies, absolutely. that is not to say that we do not have a lot of things going for us. to suggest that there is not robust entrepreneurial ecosystem developing in many different countries is just not accurate. one fact that should be scary is that there is a venture firm, xcel partners, that back facebook -- all of their ve
new york city, democrat blind, go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. even if we go over the fiscal cliff, we need a bigger plan because it does not even balance the budget. i don't think we really have a supply-side problem. they talk about cutting taxes on the right and i think there are so many people out of work and i think you need to get these people to work. i just think we have a demand issue, not a supply issue. if you're out of work, you cannot pay taxes. guest: he is exactly right -- no one is talking about a fiscal cliff that will solve the problem. there is no grand bargain being discussed except in the most general outline terms. there is enough to be -- nothing close to being politically acceptable. we're only talking of something of that will allow people to get through this. in the short term, we need to have fiscal policy that may get the deficit higher than what it would be. ben bernanke was saying the deficit could be cut too far and too fast at the same time. this has to be the time where we don't go into an austerity program. we are not quite there.
rod paige, the young women's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city -- one of the fir and most successful pilot projects for girls puc public schools wih which i know the presiding officer is very familiar. anand the i remember the time i invited senator barbara mikulski to texas. because she has and i have worked together supporting nasa for so many years, and this year she chair and i am the ranking member of the subcommittee. we went to the space center because i wanted her to see the great work done there. and then i tong her to the houston rodeo because i wanted her to see the texas cull tiewmplet well, i am not sure that the senator who grew up in the inner city of baltimore knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo. but suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and big hair and big hats. senator m mikulski whispered too me during this time, "kay, if we were here monday and we went to the chamber of commerce, would these people look like this?" and i said, "yeah, pretty much." so senator mikulski and i also teamed up to pass the h
airport, where if you ask the network engineers that i talk about, they would say new york, los angeles, ashburn, as if it were a global capital and not a tiny suburb. there is a surprisingly short list of places that are the hot spots on the internet. >> andrew blum looks for the internet in the real world monday night on "the communicators" on c-span2. next, 10 years of the e- government act, improving government access and productivity. this is just over one hour. >> all right, so why do we not just jump into this next panel? if ms. panel was about the tenures, this panel is really about the next 10 years. what are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 20
.m. and will show again at 6:00 eastern. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is the corollary dedicated to the september attacks of the world trade center. we have decided to tell the story from the first moments of the attacks using objects and photographs from the world trade center. this piece of steel, we put it in a place where the public can come and talk -- touch bit. this is a piece of steel from the north towers. this is a dramatic piece of steel. you can see the openings where the window would have been. every piece of steel as marked so you know which building, which for, and which side it was on. we picked this one because it was so close to the impact and had the numbers. 71-74. it also has the number stamp inside the steel. >>. "book tv security as we look -- book tv," as we look -- >> whether president obama is living up to his pledge to have the most open government in history. this is a 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the advisory committee on transparency and the obama presidency. the there are a many meanings of transparency. i will not get into all of them to
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9